Tag Archives: Visual Arts

Aside

Here are some of my remedies for erasing self doubt when they crop up. Continue reading

Mark September 5 on Your Calendar For Some Fun. From 6-8pm…

I Would like To See You There, Please.


On Sept. 5  •  6 – 8pm for the Opening Reception

SHAPELY pleasures”  a solo exhibition 
Recent Paintings by Joyce Wynes

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Exhibition Open From Sept. 2 – 26.    M-F 9 am – 5 pm.

Sponsored by VAE at the
United Arts Council of Wake County
410 Glenwood Ave., Ste. 170, Raleigh, NC

[See You There, OK?]

You’ll have some fun, some eats and some drinks.
Am I going to see you there on Sept. 5?


To view or purchase painting shown: “Separate From The Rest”
©Joyce Wynes  •  Acrylic/MM on Canvas • 24″ X 36″ • $2,300
To purchase a print of painting shown on fine art paper or canvas.
The MEANING behind this painting:  There is so much “noise” out there today, coming at us from all directions.  Sometimes you need to protect yourself and try to be in a separate place from most of the distractions.  Do you feel like this in your world or environment at times?


Please sign up to get my email notices to keep in touch.  Thank you all for your support for my art endeavors.
#art #painting

 

Art Lovers, Where Are You? 5 Realities of Our Time…

Are you an art lover? Then let me tell you the realities facing the artist today. Full-time artists devote a lot of time creating their art, as well as, marketing it if they are serious about their profession.  As a full-time, acrylic/mixed media, painter I spend 50-60 hours/week researching materials and techniques, educating myself on social media, painting, marketing in print and online and the 100’s of other chores necessary today for an artist to be successful.

At one time, all you did was create your work and show your work in exhibitions and galleries.  There are fewer galleries today to show our work and some of those galleries are inferior just like in any business.  They just open their doors and hope someone walks in.   The job of an artist today has become so cumbersome with so little results that one has to wonder where it will end for both the admirer and the artist.

Acrylic/MM on Canvas • 24" X 24" • $1400

Hills & Valleys of Life • Acrylic/MM on Canvas • 24″ X 24″ • $1400

To Purchase Original
To Purchase Prints on Fine Art Paper or Canvas

I know many artists question whether it is working or whether it will ever be worth their time because the buyers are an elusive bunch of people we can’t seem to find.  There is a lot of talk lately about finding your “tribe” or people who like your style or type of work.  It threw me for a loop recently, when I talked to several very good artists at different events, and they said they were thinking about just throwing in the towel.  Their canvases were piling up, they spent too much time and money they don’t have on their creations and trying to find customers on social media just wasn’t working out.  With the only people showing up at opening night exhibitions were other artists and their friends (even with all the advertising), artists are beginning to feel deserted and not getting the feedback they need to keep going.  And statistics show that very few people are commenting and liking on social media for most things.

1. The Good Artists Are Starting to Question The Job

In the near future, if more artists feel that it is just not worth it, and they cannot make a living selling their art at a fair price, you may find it more difficult to find high quality art.  Believe me, the less desirable art will still be around but the artists who give it their “ALL” and devote their time to creating a unique piece of art will not be around.  They will find other ways to express themselves.

2. You Are Not Supporting Their Work

Very few of you are showing up at exhibitions to view their work.  Very few of you are sending them confirmation or comments about their work whether by social media, email or in person.  And because the economy hasn’t fully recovered, very few of you are purchasing original art. Even if you can’t afford the work or have nowhere to place it, it would help the artist if you would give validation to an artist’s work that you feel is good.  Ask for the artist’s contact information or business card and let them know how you feel about their work. Give them leads if you know of someone else who might appreciate their work.  If you see their work on social media and like it, leave a comment. Or if you have a suggestion, let them know.

3.  We Don’t Know Where You Are

Because very few are taking the time to comment or like our work and show up to view the work at exhibitions, we don’t know where you are, what you like or how to keep you informed.  Think of it as a 2-way street, we need to have some information if we are to continue to make things that you might like and purchase in the future.  If we don’t have feedback, we are floundering in space and don’t know if we are going in the right direction.  So please come out of hiding and make yourself known.  We promise we won’t harass you, we just want to keep you informed and get feedback.  We can’t afford big, expensive marketing campaigns and expensive webinar series to try to find you (believe me, they are out there in full force trying to get artists to sign up).  Just let yourself be known and let us know what you like and don’t like.  We can take the criticism.

4.  We Waste Many Good Hours Trying To Find You

We waste countless hours on learning social media tips on how to find you.  We are told you have to write a blog and write something everyday to attract you to our work.  We have to be on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Google+, Twitter, and post to our blog interesting articles that will make you flock to our sides.  Do you know how much time it takes out of our day, week, month, year that we could be using to create something spectacular?  And statistics show that only 5% or less purchase art on the internet.  Why are we doing this?  Because we can’t find you!  And marketers say that is what we must do to find you!

5.  It Makes Us Question: Are There Really That Many Buyers Out There Anymore Who Appreciate Original Art?

Of course, there will always be art collectors at the top, investors who look for art and can afford to collect art from Sotheby’s and those well-known artists of the past (before 1990).  But what about us emerging artists?  The signals say to us, that you don’t want to be found or don’t want to buy art or don’t appreciate our best efforts at creating unique art.  You need to let us know so we can stop this time-consuming job of trying to vie for your attention.  I am sure that most people, including yourself, doesn’t like wasting your time on  research and educating yourself on techniques that don’t work, so I am sure you understand the artist’s plight.

I hope that you understand that the point of my article was not to admonish you in any way but to inform you on the artist’s plight since the 2007 downturn and the increase in social media marketing and the toll it takes on our creativity time, etc.  We need the feedback, we need the connection to the outside world, and we need the connection to the people who appreciate our work.  Even if you are not ready to buy or could possibly be a buyer in the future or won’t be a buyer but appreciate our work, we need to have a connection to you.  Help us stay motivated in this fast, changing world of ours, so that we know that there are people out there that are truly interested in what we are doing.  Comment on our posts, like our pages, and email us how you feel about our work.

What about you? Are you giving artists some feedback? And if not, why not? We would be interested in your views on this issue.

Thank your for your continued support and while you are here, if you would add your name to my mailing list so I can keep you informed, I would greatly appreciate it.

An Artist’s Perspective: “Unraveling the Family Tree”

Do your know your family history?  Do you know where you came from & the route your family took to get here?  And do you know the stories & feelings behind their journey?

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That is the thinking behind my current painting, Unraveling the Family Tree, 30″ X 40″ X 1.5, Acrylic/MM on Canvas.

If you look deeply into the palm of your hand, you will see your parents and all generations of your ancestors.  All of them are alive in this moment. Each is present in your body. You are the continuation of each of these people.
Thich Nhat Hanh

Where we come from is so important, but unfortunately as in my case, we think we have forever to find out. I continued to shove it aside other than gathering bits and pieces in conversation with relatives at family gatherings.  You get so busy and have your young family to take care of.  I now wish I had paid more attention and asked more questions.

Of course, I know the basics.  My grandmother and grandfather on my mother’s side came from southern Italy when they were very young, both at different times.  My grandmother was promised to my grandfather in marriage and came to the US when she was 15 years old to marry him.  He was 22 years old and had come to the US at a younger age.  I can’t imagine how frightening that had to be for her and to marry someone she didn’t know!  And the worst part, not to have a voice in her future.

But what I want to know is how she felt about it.  As a woman myself, who stands up for and votes for women’s rights and equality, I feel so much empathy for my grandmother or any woman who had to live under that paternalistic society.

I wish I had been able to ask my grandmother questions then that are in the forefront of my thinking now.  With the women’s movement and women’s rights issues, I would have loved to question her on her feelings as a woman on how she felt about her life choices or lack of life choices.  What her secret interests were in life.  If she could do anything what would it be.  What were her feelings and stories about the trip from Italy to the US.  And would she feel able to share them or hold them tight to her breast for safekeeping?

Many of my extended family either never knew much more, have memory problems because of age or have passed away so it is going to be a much harder journey to find out more information now.  But it is mostly about feelings and stories that I am after in general and my grandmother in particular and her voice is no more, lost to me forever.  Anything I learn now would be only guessing and speculation.

It is not until you are older that you begin to wonder about how you fit into the picture of your family structure.  Who and where did I get my talent.  When you think of the history and stories that are lost, it is just so sad that future generations lose the connection with that voice.

I am curious, though, after painting this piece, how much of your family history do you know and do you really think or want to know?  Does it make you feel disconnected?  Did you ask the important questions?  Do you still have time to gather that information?  If so, keep a journal for the next generation because one of your relatives will be grateful to have the voice of the past revealed to them even if it just starts with your voice.  If nothing else, start recording your journey.  Don’t wake up to regrets.

Please share this with someone who will benefit from its contents.  It might start a conversation.  Follow my blog to get the stories behind the paintings.  Comments to this post are most welcome.  Let’s start a dialogue.

Visit my website to view more of my paintings.  And as always, thanks for all your support.

An Artist’s Perspective: “Up, Down and All Around”

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“Our lives take us in all different directions. Detours are a part of life but it depends on how you view them that tells the difference.  Some detours have enriched my life with information that I would not have had any other way. Some detours were not as productive.  Experience lets me readily identify them and decide how long I am willing to travel on that road.”  That is a description of the painting above, “Up, Down and All Around”, one of my latest acrylic/mm creations on canvas, 24″ X 36″.

Many of my non-representational, abstract paintings show twists and turns, lines going in different directions, vertical then suddenly horizontal, shapes breaking through another section and turning into some other shape.  And it turns into a pleasing landscape of colors,  shapes and patterns that work together to create balance and purpose.

But, is that how life is today?  All these things thrown at us to make our lives more purposeful and balanced.  Think about it.  Everyday I get tons of email from marketing solicitors wanting to make my business more productive or giving me advice on how to make social media work for me.  This is where I took my detour in December 2013.  And I am quickly getting out of that line and back into my more productive pattern.

For example, they send screaming headlines that you need to be on Pinterest, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and have a blog and website, etc., etc. and how to make each of these better for you to get LIKES and more followers. whether to use #’s or not, FB is a Must, Twitter is a Must and How to Use It, Is Everyone Leaving FB and Should You (this after I had just signed up & paid for a FB class on how to use it???), Twitter is Going Down (just after I purchased their stock for my retirement portfolio???), Tips to Boost your Twitter Conversations, Topics to Make a Great Blog and Get Followers, How Often to Post – I could literally go on and on.  And at the end of each of these is an advertisement that wants you to buy a book or sign up for classes or listen to a free informational video and then sign up for their class.  Oh I forgot, I need to make videos now to engage people to my site.  Just signed up for that course!

They are out in full force lately.  And now want you to be one of them-they offer a course on how to do that; a coach selling your advice on whatever you know about.  And I know a lot about various subjects because I was a graphic designer with my own business, a professional illustrator illustrating for many big magazine companies and a fine art painter.  At one time I worked in marketing research for a large company doing statistics (I am good at math), I know how to market, I’m a mother, etc., etc, etc.  But I would not want to inflict myself on the masses in the same way as these marketers are doing today just to get a client.

It is enough to make you go crazy.  Anyone trying to market their small business probably knows what I mean.  I question myself, am I doing it right, did I say the wrong thing, am I supposed to post this here, and the what if’s . . .   There was an article I read just recently talking about decision fatigue and how making many choices saps your willpowerAre any of these things adding anything significant to your business other than more work and a stress-filled schedule?  That is the important question for each of us to answer for ourselves.  Come on be honest.  Are you just a slave to these new things that were supposed to make our lives easier to market ourselves or stay in touch or do you really enjoy them.

I, for one, am going to be much, much, much more selective.  Why?  Because to be a painter and run a business you need to FOCUS. I am going to sign up for less because when I read these advice blogs and take the coaching classes, I realize that in most cases I already knew most of the information or the information does not apply to me and my business.  I am going to take a cold, hard look at what is working and what is not and let go of the baggage, the extra stress and the lack of focus.

Social media is still a good use for marketing but I am not going to get crazy about it and give more importance to it then it deserves.  My website and my blog is most important and those are my priorities. Who is deciding FB is great one day and dead the next?  That little guy in the corner office?  (You know guys, this would make a great little humorous, illustrated book. And I might just create it.  Would you buy it? OMG I am turning into ONE of THEM.) FOCUS

My new pledge is: if I need more information on a subject, I will buy a book.  They don’t leave email and they just sit on my night stand.  If I get stressed seeing them there because I haven’t read them lately, I will move them to another location, preferably under the bed.  See I learned some information that enriched my life from this detour and I am once again focused!

Please comment below how you feel about the detours your life is taking lately and if they are productive or making you go bonkers.  I love to hear from other people and learn from their perspectives.

Usually my paintings let loose a philosophy lesson as I splash on the paint (I loved my philosophy courses in college).  So I am starting this as a series.  Every time I finish a painting, I am going to do “An Artist’s Perspective” article explaining what the story is behind the painting or what feelings or questions on life the painting brought out as I was creating.  Each painting on my website has an artist’s comment but this, “An Artist’s Perspective”, will elaborate on the subject.

I guarantee you won’t be bored.  You don’t have to agree with my ramblings because that is what makes us individuals but you will get a first-hand view of my thinking as I paint.  Please become a “follower” and sign up to get a notice when it arrives.  Thanks for your support of my art and vision.

Solo Art Exhibition in Asheville, NC

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Curated by Wendy H. Outland, Owner and Art Consultant of Who Knows Art at www.whoknowsart.biz
Showing 15 of the latest Abstract Paintings by Joyce Wynes

April 7 – July 14, 2014
MAHEC Eductaion Building
121 Hendersonville Road • Asheville, NC 28803

OPEN:  8am – 5:30pm Monday thru Friday • 828 257-4400

Wynes describes her process:
“Did you ever wish that you could recapture the carefree, playful, questioning feelings of your childhood?  That is what happens to me every time I put my brush to canvas.  My Acrylic/Mixed Media paintings are a reflection of carefree memories and internalized images, flavored by my still apparent “childhood” influences.”

Bold colors and stylized, primal subjects in both representational and non-representational abstracts have entertained collectors for years.  Try to recapture your playful, questioning side by visiting the exhibition.  You won’t regret it.

You can see more of Wynes’s paintings by visiting her website.  See what her art can do to stimulate your senses.

6 Tips for the Beginner Art Collector (or for Anyone Buying a Painting)

MovingSpaces1_SmDo you want to start an art collection or did you see a painting that you would love to purchase but are unsure what to ask or what to look for in your investment?

Don’t fret because you are not alone.  There are many people with the same problem.  Some people will walk away from a painting even though they love it because they are unsure about their purchase or are embarrassed to ask the questions.  Let me begin this article by saying that artists love to talk about their work so bring on the questions.  And if the gallery doesn’t have the answer, ask them nicely to ask the artist and get back to you.

Here are 6 helpful tips to consider in deciding that purchase.

1.  Follow Your Intuition
First things first!  If you can’t keep your eyes off that painting, then your gut is telling you that you have a connection with it.  It is speaking to you in some way whether provoking a memory or a pleasant experience, etc.  If this happens to you, you might want to consider purchasing it because when it finds a place in your business or home, you will relive that experience every time you view it.  What more could you ask for in a purchase?

2.  Don’t Be Swayed By a Low Price Tag
There are many steps and processes to creating a painting that will stand the test of time.  If you are considering your painting as an investment, and not just something to match the sofa, then you need to ask some important questions of the artist or gallery owner.

Beware of low price tags.  The artist either hasn’t taken the steps (plus time) needed to prepare the work as it should be as an investment for the buyer or they don’t value their work.  In either case, the buyer is the loser in this transaction.  Also, beware of artists who give steep discounts on their work.  Investors don’t get the investment value on their piece if they can buy it cheaper if they wait until the artist has a “SALE”.

Professional Rule #1: Artists should not lower their prices because it lowers the value of their other client’s investment in their work who are already collectors.  Collectors want the value to go up, not down!

3.  Preparing the Canvas, Board or Paper When Using Acrylic or Oil
When using acrylic and/or oil, the surfaces above should be prepared with acrylic Gesso as a binder that makes sure that the paint layers bind with the surface.  For my canvas or board surfaces, I usually apply 4-5 layers of gesso before applying the acrylic paint.  Gesso, however, should not be used as a white paint in the actual painting.  Be sure to ask the artist about surface preparation.

4. When Paintings Have Some Collage Elements
Adding collage to paintings is a technique used by many artists today but also by many famous artists of the past as well, such as Picasso and Matisse.  Collaged elements and papers start a debate in itself so I will leave that for now.  My best advice is to make sure that the right adhesives have been used to glue the elements down on the painted surface.  Not all glues are advisable for all surfaces.  For an acrylic painting I used gel mediums or the acrylic paint itself as a glue.  And I always apply a varnish or medium on the top of the collaged item to protect it from harm.

5.  Storing Paintings
I love rotating out the paintings on my walls every so often to get a whole new look.  But, what do you do with the painting(s) that are retired for now?

They should be stacked in a place away from traffic patterns so they don’t get damaged, and in a way that neither points, objects or the hanging wires are penetrating the canvas.  Otherwise the canvas will form dent marks which don’t come out of stretched canvas and will crack the paint surface.  I have bought tall, thin, moving boxes and stored my paintings in those but I leave the top open or create holes in the cardboard because canvas likes to breathe.

Temperature is another factor.  Paintings need to be stored in an area where the temperature is moderate, not cold or hot.   The stress caused by extreme temperatures will break down the paint, as well as, warp the wooden, stretched frame.  I recommend buyers of a painting to go right home with it because the temperature in your car on a warm day can warp the frame so that it will not lie down flat to the wall and can ruin the paint.

6.  I Can’t Afford it Right Now.  What Are My Options?
I don’t know about other artists, but I will take payments on a painting(s) over a period of time and will hold the painting for the buyer until it is paid in full.  The period of time (up to 6 months) depends on the price.  And if a client buys more than 1 painting they will get a discount on their additional purchase at the time.  If you really love that painting, ask about options to owning it.

There is nothing more rewarding than finding a piece of art that speaks to you every time you walk in the room.  I hope these tips make your buying  adventure a better experience and protects your investment for future generations.

If you know of another person who you think would like to have these tips for their art buying experience, please share this blog post with them.  And if you would like to see if my art speaks out to you, please visit my website and view my portfolio.